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10/27/2018  |   9:10 AM - 10:10 AM   |  Kramer Lecture Theater 2

A Band-aid Fixed Bone-conduction Hearing Aid – The ADHEAR – A New and Useful Treatment Option for Children with Conductive Hearing Loss

Conventional bone conduction hearing aids for children have several disadvantages. Headband-integrated systems are frequently not well accepted due to pressure on the head, sweating, or cosmetic stigma. The mechanical conduction loss is higher as for percutaneous systems. The new bone conduction hearing aid ADHEAR, where an audio processor is connected to a band-aid fixed behind the ear, has been designed to overcome these disadvantages. This controlled clinical study evaluates the audiometric benefit, the usage and the patients' and parents' satisfaction of 12 children aged 0.8-9.8 years with a permanent conductive hearing loss using a band-aid-fixed ADHEAR system compared with a headband-integrated bone conduction hearing aid. Aided and unaided pure tone/behavioral observational audiometry and speech audiometry both in quiet and noise were assessed initially with both hearing devices and after 8 weeks of ADHEAR use, questionnaires were administered to the parents and children. Participants showed a significantly better audiometric outcome using the ADHEAR systems compared with head-band-integrated hearing aids. All parents except two evaluated the ADHEAR as a useful or very useful device for their child. For children <1 year of age, adherence problems of the band-aid occurred occasionally. Adverse skin reactions occurred in two cases, and two children refused the ADHEAR due to feedback and comfort problems. The other eight children continued using the ADHEAR. The ADHEAR system seems to be a useful technical solution for children with conductive hearing loss or chronic draining ears. Shortcomings regarding the adherence of the band-aid, feedback, wear comfort, and adverse skin reactions can be overcome.

  • To weigh the current options of treating bone conduction hearing loss in children, in particular ear atresia
  • To learn about a new bone conduction hearing system that is fixed with a band-aid at a patient’s head
  • To understand that the new bone conduction hearing system results in a better auditory outcome than conventional headband-integrated bone conduction hearing aids

Presentation:
18607_9966KatrinNeumann.pdf

Handouts:
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Katrin Neumann (POC,Primary Presenter), University of Bochum, Germany, Katrin.Neumann@rub.de;
Prof. Katrin Neumann is Head of the Dept. of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology and of the Hearing and Cochlear Implant Center at the University of Bochum, Germany. She chairs the Technical Access Committee of the Coalition on Global Hearing Health and chaired the Audiology Committee of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP). She contributes to the work of the Prevention of Deafness and Hearing Impairment Team of the World Health Organization as a member of the WHO Expert Advisory Board. She is associate editor of several international journals, received a couple of national and international awards, and has published more than 190 original articles, monographies, and book chapters. Her research focuses are: implementation of newborn hearing screening, language screening, and CMV screening programs for children, population medicine in pediatric audiology, examination of speech, language, and hearing processes with neuroimaging techniques, signal analysis in voice physiology and pathology, nature and treatment of stuttering, singer´s voice, diagnostics, treatment and rehabilitation of children with hearing aids, CIs and other hearing implants.

      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


      AAA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.

Stefan Dazert (Author,Co-Author), University of Bochum Germany, Stefan.Dazert@rub.de;
Prof. Stefan Dazert is head of the Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery at the Ruhr-University Bochum. He has a broad expertise in all surgical procedures of the temporal bone and the lateral skull base including infectious diseases and cochlear implantation (Minovi et al., 2013, Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol; Olszewska et al., 2013, Otol Neurootol). His main research interest is to investigate criteria for auditiory neuron survival and neurite extension to potentially improve cochlear implant efficacy (Brors et al., 2008, Audiol Neurootol; Dazert et al., 2008, Brain Res). In the project described here he is responsible for the surgical collection of intracochlear and intravestibular fluids for further CMV screening and possibly for cell culture experiments of inner ear tissues.
      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


      AAA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.

Jan Peter-Thomas (Co-Author), Clinic of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, St. Elisabeth-Hospital, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany, Jan.Thomas@ruhr-uni-bochum.de;
Jan Peter Thomas, M.D., works as leading senior physician at the Clinic of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, St. Elisabeth-Hospital, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany. He has studied in medicine at the University of Colon with stays at the New York Medical College, N.Y. and the Harvard Medical School, Boston. He has, among others, special clinical expertise in ear surgery including middle ear and cochlear implants, and implantable bone conduction hearing systems. His research field is implantable hearing systems.
      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


      AAA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exists.